We receive many owner surrenders each week, often they are house cats or elderly dogs who have been in the homes they’re being removed from for many years. The stress of being left behind can negatively affect certain animals more than others–and it’s important to consider the following.

Many variables enter into whether or not an animal will thrive in the shelter environment. The shelter workers are often overwhelmed by the expectations individuals place upon them in reference to their discarded pet(s). Keep in mind how many discarded animals are cared for by these individuals each day, and that no promises can be made in reference to adoption guarantees.

Having your pet spayed or neutered and in good health will increase the chances of it being adoptable.

Things to ask yourself before surrendering–
-Can you place your pet with a family member, co-worker, or friend? Work your personal network for individuals or families who might be a good match for your pet.
-If you’re surrendering your pet for a behavior problem, ask yourself if the animal gets enough exercise and mental stimulation through toys and social time. Boredom and pent up energy are the origins of many behavior problems such as chewing and barking. Have you consulted your veterinarian, a professional trainer, or behaviorist for help?
-If you’re surrendering your pet for house breaking trouble, many times this behavior is linked to stress. Even subtle changes in the home (and certainly new pets or people) can disrupt an animal’s habits. Not cleaning a litter box often enough, or not walking a dog sufficiently or keeping the yard free of waste can result in animals soiling inappropriately. Have you consulted your veterinarian, a professional trainer, or behaviorist for help?
-If you are surrendering a pet because of a challenge you do not want to deal with, keep in mind that a stranger may not want to deal with it either. This decreases the chance of the pet being adopted to a new home.
-If your allergies are compelling you to surrender your pet, have you exhausted options for air purifiers and medications? Have you consulted a doctor to discuss all options?

Abandoning a pet in a public place or leaving it at a residence you are vacating is illegal. If you must surrender your pet, contact us at 740-622-9741. If you discover an animal you believe is a stray, we recommend you contact our wardens or our office for assistance. There is no charge for bringing strays to the shelter. Please note that CCAS/HATA turns no animal away. We understand that surrendering your pet can be a very difficult and painful decision to make. However, many people discard pets very casually. Be careful to not use “free to a good home” on Facebook or other buying/selling online options. You should always charge some type of fee and most importantly truly research the individual and the potential home prior to turning over your animal to a stranger.

$25.00 county fee for in county & out of county dogs/larger puppies, smaller litters of puppies under 3 months are $25 per litter. Cats and kittens accepted at no fee, donations are deeply appreciated. Thank you!